Is Vaping Good for You?

woman vape ciggerate vaping device

In recent years, vaping has grown from a less than well-known alternative to smoking into the most commonly used form of tobacco by youth in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

 

While doctors agree that vaping poses less of danger to users that smoking does, there are still some health concerns about this new method of taking in nicotine. In this article, we will be examining what vaping is and whether E-cigarettes are actually good for you.

What Is Vaping?

Vaping, so-called because the liquid in an E-cigarettes is vaporized before being inhaled, uses propylene glycol or glycerin, usually coupled with a flavoring, as a suspension that is used to administer nicotine.

 

E-cigarettes or “vape pens” contain a heating element that vaporizes the glycerin, which is then inhaled by the user in a similar method to smoking a cigarette. The nicotine is then absorbed through the lining of the lungs into the bloodstream.

 

Vaping does offer significant health benefits in comparison to smoking, with a substantially lowered risk of cancer and other smoking-related illnesses across the board.

 

 A 2015 Harvard study indicated that 44% of surveyed Americans believed that e-cigarettes are less harmful than tobacco cigarettes. While this is true, people often conflate “less harmful” with “not harmful” and that is not quite the case with vaping.

Health Concerns Around Vaping

One of the main concerns around vaping is its massive rise in popularity, especially in young people. A 2016 Department of Health and Human Services report states that e-cigarette use is up 900% among high school students from 2011 to 2015.

 

This is a concern because, while the ingredients that act as a suspension for the nicotine in vape pens are less harmful than tobacco, research by the American Lung Association (ALA) indicates that nicotine has been associated with lasting cognitive and behavioral impairments, including effects on memory, learning, and attention. 

 

The CDC has raised concerns over vaping in young people, add that “Nicotine can harm the developing adolescent brain. The brain keeps developing until about age 25.”

 

While the use of propylene glycol or glycerin as a suspension does pose significantly lower health risks than smoking cigarettes, the long-term effects of e-cigarettes have yet to be studied in detail.

 

Some vaping liquids contain potentially harmful chemicals like formaldehyde and, According to the American Lung Association, using electronic cigarettes or vaping, particularly the flavored varieties, can cause popcorn lung.

 

This is because many flavored vaping “juices” contain diacetyl, a chemical which was once commonly used to give food products, such as popcorn, a rich, buttery flavor.

Less Harmful, but Not Side-effect Free

The reality is that, while vaping offers significant health benefits to those switching from regular cigarettes, there is a justified concern that its popularity with younger people may cause significant health concerns, especially in the area of cognitive developments.

 

Long-term vaping could also lead to a range of health concerns, from popcorn lung to an increased vulnerability to common lung diseases.

A Vital Part Of The Healthcare Cycle

Taken together, medical coding and billing form a link between patients, healthcare providers, and insurance companies. As a medical biller or coder, you’ll need to be accurate, detail-oriented and well organized as you’ll be a vital part of any healthcare provider’s staff.

 

As one of the premier Medical Billing and Coding Schools in Las Vegas, Northwest Career College employs established, seasoned instructors to teach you every aspect of medical billing and coding. Our student-focused approach puts you first and we offer online and on-campus workshops to accommodate your work and family schedule.

 

We continue to support our students after they graduate as our experienced Career Services team works with you to help you find the medical billing and coding jobs in Las Vegas. Call us today on (702) 403-1592 to learn more about the exciting opportunities that our Medical Billing and Coding School can offer you!

 

Written by:

Nancy Ferrante, C.M.B.S.
Medical Billing & Coding Program Chair